The Diamond Planet

A recent cosmological discovery got me thinking once again about the what George Gilder and others term the materialist fallacy. From a Reuters report from last Thursday:

An exotic planet that seems to be made of diamond racing around a tiny star in our galactic backyard in an undated image courtesy of Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne. REUTERS/HandoutAstronomers have spotted an exotic planet that seems to be made of diamond racing around a tiny star in our galactic backyard.

The new planet is far denser than any other known so far and consists largely of carbon. Because it is so dense, scientists calculate the carbon must be crystalline, so a large part of this strange world will effectively be diamond.

Materialists, including many of my Libertarian friends who favor a return to the gold standard, will have to conclude:

  • This planet is more wealthy than we are. After all it is a diamond with the mass Jupiter.
  • We would be better off if this heavenly body were to break free of its orbit and be sent on a path to impact (or maybe just orbit) the Earth. Perhaps T. Boone Pickens and DeBeers can concoct a plan to (as they say in the Beltway) “effort” this.
  • The really good news is that there are likely more of these throughout the galaxy and universe for it is only recently that we as a species have been able to detect these orbs.

This is materialist wealth creation at its finest!

Side note and bonus material:

I am not sure why, but my brain was reminded of this classic Bugs and Daffy cartoon. Enjoy!

ET HORA LIBELLUM DELENDA EST

Tags: , , , ,

3 Responses to “The Diamond Planet”

  1. Peter Wolf August 29, 2011 at 11:11 am #

    So… are the astronomers who discovered it rich? Did they just create wealth?

  2. Ed Kless August 29, 2011 at 11:49 am #

    No, how would you conclude that?

  3. Gary Crouch August 29, 2011 at 3:05 pm #

    However, with a whole planet of diamond overhead the value of the rock would plummet. Assuming Boone T. and DeBeers did not monopolize the distribution (I am sure Sir Branson would have weekend shuttles running too and fro) the ordinary-ness of diamond would rank right up there with beach sand. Necessary for vacations, but not very marketable. Thus, oversupply with little demand, equals no new wealth created by this sparkly.

    Besides, I have already purchased the small sun and all related planets for $19.95 for my wife’s upcoming birthday at star registry.com!

Leave a Reply