A Pricing Idea Confirmed

For years, whenever I have spoken about offering access level agreements, I have suggested a 20 percent premium if the customer wants to pay monthly instead of annually.

Last week, I got some confirmation that my pricing suggestion is right on target. Google is now offering a monthly subscription price for their Google Apps. The only price offered in the past was $50 per user per year, cheap enough to be sure.

Now, they offer a monthly price of $5 per user per month – a difference of, you guessed it, 20 percent.

Every so often, I get one way right!

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Considering Facebook Advertising

At the end of my recent failed political campaign for Texas State Senate, I took out a few Facebook ads which I believe to have been moderately successful.

The first was early in the campaign after launching my campaign Facebook site. The ad was to all anyone in the United States who had listed “Libertarian” in their profile. Within four days I had gone from 150 friends of the site to over 600. The ad cost me $100 and while I do not think anyone who “liked” the page from this ad donated money, several become regular contributors the conversation on the site lending it higher credibility to subsequent visitors who did, in fact contribute.

The second ad was over the five day period before Election Day. In created an ad specifically targeted at the four major cities in the Senatorial District in which I was running and it excluded people who were already friends of the page. In all, I received 1,227,893 impressions over this critical five day period. I am certain that this helped my campaign with name recognition and increased my overall vote total.

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What I find so fascinating about this is the ad engine works 180 degrees differently that Google Adwords. With Adwords, you are trying figure out what a prospect might type into the search box, with Facebook, you are selecting the criteria of the intended target audience. It is very powerful.

imageAs an example, I created an ad for everyone over the age of 18 in the state of Texas who listed “Accounting” as a interest. As you can see this ad, if I ran it would target 8,440. Not a large number, but certainly a very targeted list.

I see this as assisting not only prospecting, but in the creation of candidate pools for jobs.

If any of you have additional experience with Facebook ads and care to share your results, I would love to hear about them.

Report on ITA General Session – Google Enterprise

This is the fifth in a series of postings about my thoughts from sessions that I attended at the Information Technology Alliance’s Fall Collaborative (<-I love that word) held in Palm Springs.

This was one of the most anticipated sessions of the conference and it did not disappoint. Michael Lock is the director of channel at Google and give the association an update on Google’s thinking:

Google makes the assumption of abundance of all things, for example, bandwidth and processing power. Apple did this when they created the graphical user interface. You must assume abundance to be innovative.

Some choice quotes were:

  • “We will look for a fewer number of quality partners.”
  • “You can move off of google.com anytime at zero switching cost. We have to keep you interested.”
  • “Operating systems should be (errr, will be) free!”
  • “Google is in the 1st inning of the first game of a 162 game season.”
  • “Google has over one million users on the Premier version of Google apps at $50 a pop that’s a cool $50 million.”
  • “Google has introduced 109 new features in gmail this year alone. How were we able to do this – We only have one version.”

When asked about Google Wave, Lock replied that he is unclear of what will happen it. I love that. That is how great innovation is done – lots of ideas. Some of them will work and some won’t.

In a moment of pure irony the presentation Lock was using, created in Google’s presentation software, of course, was interrupted by a Microsoft Windows dialogue box with an error message indicating that ActiveX (a Microsoft product) had crashed.