I’ll have a Yogi Berra please

Lawrence Peter "Yogi" Berra (May 12, 1925 – September 22, 2015)
Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra (May 12, 1925 – September 22, 2015)

While I was deeply saddened to hear about the passing of Mets (well, and Yankees) legend Yogi Berra this morning. I felt compelled to share a conversation had on my Facebook page during which Yogi gave us one last chuckle.

One commenter suggested that Yogi was the “Arnold Palmer of baseball” to which I responded that we needed to create a drink in honor of him. I came up with the following:

  • Half club soda
  • Half seltzer
  • Half carbonated water

My plan is to order one at a restaurant in the near future. Here is how I envision the conversation:

Me: I have a Yogi Berra.
Server: Never heard of that sir. What is in it?
Me: Easy it is half club soda, half seltzer and half carbonated water.
Server: Okay… Wait… what?

As a youth I proudly wore number 8 in honor of him. He was the manager of the Mets at the time.

Yogi is truly a hero of mine. Not only is he the only person I can think of who bridges the Met-Yankee divide, but his legendary reformulations of quotations are always inspirational.

When speaking I often refer to him as “that great American philosopher, Yogi Berra.” In my book he is up there with Walt Whitman, Mark Twain and Will Rogers.

My personal favorite quote: We made too many wrong mistakes.

Much wisdom in that.

RIP, Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra (May 12, 1925 – September 22, 2015)

Who Are Your Heroes?

At the Academy Awards, Matthew McConaughey gave the most talked about speech of the evening upon receiving the Oscar for Best Actor of the year. The speech begins about 45 seconds in.


Matthew McConaughey – Acceptance Speech…

At about 2:40 in, McConaughey answers my favorite interview question. In fact, if I could only ask a candidate one question, it would be “Who are your heroes and why?” I guess that is actually two questions.

My reason is that it is the best question in order to get to know someone. Most people answer family members, spouse, parents, grandparents, even their kids.

While there is no right or wrong answer to the question, the answer I like to hear least is, “No one, I do not have heroes.” To be frank, if I am the interviewer and someone answers the question this way, it is highly unlikely I would recommend hiring that person not matter how qualified they were for the position.

I thought McConaughey’s answer was excellent.

What are your thoughts on the question and McConaughey’s answer?